#atozchallenge, I is for Island…

Iolana gazed at endless ocean in the distance as she waited for her bus.  She had studied long and hard to earn scholarships and soon she’d be going to college on the mainland.  The island was beautiful, but life was difficult for locals.  Her parents worked constantly, two jobs each, to keep their home in a rundown neighborhood that looked nothing like the tropical resorts that tourists loved.

She would return one day with her medical degree and open a free clinic.  If medical care was closer and more affordable, she thought sadly, perhaps her grandfather would still be alive.

My theme this year is 100 word fiction (so, no, don’t count this line!)

 

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24 responses

  1. How many careers are launched due to family tragedy? This is a great real world flash.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Joe. The contrast between the resorts and where locals live always bothers me.

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      1. I have been to Belize three times on mission trips, hopefully four if I get to go this year and when I tell people that they smile and nod as if I go to the resort areas to assist tourists. You are so correct, there is such a stark separation of worlds that it makes you wonder how they can lay in side by side.

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      2. When we’ve been in Hawaii, parts of the islands where the locals live are nothing like the resort areas.

        Liked by 2 people

  2. A true representation of life on some of the remote islands. Leaving for the mainland is the only way to achieve many things.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, yes, it feels that way to me…

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Very sweet and sad too. The islands with all their beauty and the poverty stricken population barely benefits from the economy brought in by the resorts. It’s grossly unfair. 😦

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  4. True also for islands a lot closer to home. A hard life, with everyone having several jobs to do, long hours, no sick pay, maternity leave, etc. Lovely tale!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Parts of Hawaii look like a third world country when you get away from the resort’s!

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Wow. A beautiful piece of flash fiction centred around a sad reality. We need more people like Iolana!

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    1. Thanks much, Shweta! I think so, too.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Do keep writing. 😊

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  6. When this month is over, you’re going to have so many little stories that you can expand! I’m jealous! I’ve been stuck for new fiction ideas for a long time. I don’t know that I’ll be writing fiction ever again!

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    1. I’m hoping this is a good exercise and I can expand some! If you find any inspiration in it, the 100 word stories are quick and easy

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I just have no ideas. If one starts to come to me… it stops too quickly… like, it’s not enough to go on. I don’t know… It really feels like I’m done… Certainly never going to publish anything so I kind of feel like there’s no point anyway.

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      2. I can’t help writing, I guess. I have so many ideas that go nowhere, but this is at least forcing me to write them down. I do need to work ahead a little!

        Liked by 1 person

  7. There is a pang of sadness inside this tight story, but you could also have given it the H for Hope. She’s determined, and if I’m looking correctly beyond the end of the story, she does come back years later with her medical degree. Too late to save her grandfather … but not her father!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much for your feedback! I’m enjoying these little vignettes and hoping to expand some down the road.

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  8. Amazing! You’re inspiring me to do #ff next April!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, I think it will be a good source for future stories, too 😉

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Beautiful text! 🌺

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  10. Nicely told. Loss is always painful, but it’s amazing how often grief combines with love and compassion to become a force for good.

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